Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Campaign

January 20, 2022
Authored by
Banner titled Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

About Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month is an annual observance held throughout the month of March. It was established in 2000 as an annual opportunity to raise awareness of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to promote research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship and cure. The goal is to support those affected by CRC and encourage health-promoting behaviors such as getting screened, staying active, and eating a balanced diet. “80% in Every Community” is an initiative from the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) that emphasizes these goals and aims to achieve 80% CRC screening rates in every community (NCCRT, 2021).

Data and Statistics

In 2018, the latest year for which incidence data is available, in the United States, 141, 074 news cases of CRC were reported, and 52,163 people died of this cancer (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021). For every 100,000 people, 37 new CRC cases were reported and 13 people died of this cancer (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021). CRC is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide (Kadakuntla et al., 2021).

Screening is a proven tool to reduce the burden of CRC. Screening not only detects cancer early, but may also detect and remove pre-cancerous polyps, which are abnormal growths (NCCRT 2019, p.7). In May of 2021, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released new screening recommendations for CRC, stating that adults ages 45 to 75 years be screened for CRC. The primary change to the guideline was that average risk adults are now recommended to start screening at age 45 instead of age 50 (USPSTF, 2021). Adults ages 76 to 85 years should talk to their doctor about whether they should be screened (USPSTF, 2021).

Several recommended screening tests are available. Doctors and patients may consider a wide variety of factors when deciding which test may be appropriate for each person (USPSTF, 2021). Recommended screening strategies include stool tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and CT colonography (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2021).
 However, barriers to screening still remain. These barriers include:

  • Avoiding screening due to being busy or not being able to take time off from work
  • Fear of unfavorable test results
  • Perceived high cost of screening tests
  • Strong beliefs about the unpleasantness of the test procedure or preparation
  • Misbelief that having no family history of colorectal cancer means screening is not needed (NCCRT 2019, p.17)
  • Misbelief that persons with CRC always have symptoms, as CRC does not always cause symptoms in the early stages of disease (CDC, What Are the Symptoms, 2021)
  • Concern that cancer screenings may be unavailable due to the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Kadakuntla et al., 2021)
  • Fear of COVID-19 exposure with in-person screening visits (Kadakuntla et al., 2021)

Effective themes for screening messages include, “Screening helps prevent colorectal cancer”; “You can do the screening at home”; and “Other individuals like you found a way to get screened” (NCCRT, 2019, p.24). Despite improvements in CRC screening rates over time, one in three adults ages 50-75 are not getting screened as recommended (NCCRT, 2019, p. 7). Of those adults, those in rural, low education/income, and certain racial and ethnic communities experience lower screening rates (NCCRT, 2021). To address this, messages should also highlight the impact of CRC across all communities and emphasize how many lives could be saved through screening. Please see the section on “Communicating with Diverse Audiences” for more information.

When crafting materials and messages to encourage screening, audiences from all literacy levels benefit from simple messages and illustrations (Meppelink et al., 2015). Consider making your messages and content highly shareable, as Cutrona et al. (2013) found that many adults are willing to share their screening experiences via email or social media.
 

Best Practices for Communicating About Colorectal Cancer

Screening helps reduce your risk of CRC

  • Promote the benefits of screening for prevention and early detection. Individuals may not be aware of screening for CRC or do not receive information from their doctor about screening (Small et al., 2020; Nagelhout et al., 2017).
  • Explain that screening can prevent CRC by detecting polyps that can easily be removed. Messages should highlight the fact that a person can prevent CRC through regular screening (NCCRT, 2019, p. 24). Such messaging can also address fear of an unfavorable test result, which is a commonly cited barrier to screening (Nagelhout et al., 2017).
  • Encourage providers to remind patients to be screened. Lack of a doctor recommendation is a common barrier to CRC screening (Small et al., 2020). Adults whose healthcare providers involved them in decision-making and gave them a chance to ask questions were more likely to receive CRC screenings (Kindratt et al., 2020).
  • Emphasize that CRC screening is recommended by the USPSTF and is a well-tested, highly effective tool for reducing the burden of colorectal cancer. 

You can do the screening at home

  • For those at average risk of CRC, highlight screening options that can be done at home to address a variety of barriers such as avoidance due to being busy and/or concern about colonoscopy preparation (USPSTF, 2021; NCCRT, 2019, p. 27). At-home screening tests can reduce fear of exposure to COVID-19 during in-person medical visits (Kadakuntla et al., 2021).
  • Promote multiple screening options, such as fecal immunochemical tests (FIT), high sensitivity fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), FIT-DNA testing, sigmoidoscopy, CT colonography or colonoscopy. Presenting screening options other than colonoscopy can reduce anxiety associated with the procedure and preparations beforehand (NCCRT, 2019, p. 27). However, colonoscopies are necessary if at-home test results are positive or abnormal (CDC, 2021).
  • Provide information about affordable at-home screening options as it addresses time concerns, affordability and “enables individuals to feel in control” (NCCRT, 2019, p. 27). 

Talk to your friends and family about their experience getting screened

  • Use culturally appropriate and diverse testimonials to reach populations that are underserved with lower screening rates. Showcase images and stories of people that are familiar to the audience you are trying to reach (NCCRT, 2019, p. 24).
  • Use testimonials with cancer survivors to increase perceived severity of CRC, which has been associated with increasing rates of screening (McQueen et al., 2019).
  • Make testimonial messages and information emotionally interesting, or vivid, as this is strongly associated with increased knowledge and intention to get screened (Dillard & Main, 2013). 
  • Use narratives, or personal stories, to convey information through others’ experiences. Ensure that narratives are culturally appropriate and tailored to a group’s values and beliefs. Narratives may work better if they also address structural barriers, such as cost, transportation and access to screening options (Woudstra & Suurmond, 2019). 
  • Ensure messages and testimonials have a positive, reassuring tone and emphasize that screening is “worth it” (Weaver et al., 2015).

Communicating with Diverse Audiences

Certain groups experience disparities in CRC screening, incidence, mortality, and survival (National Cancer Institute, 2020). Cancer health disparities are complex and affected by various factors, such as social determinants of health, behavior, biology, genetics, and more (National Cancer Institute, 2020). Communication-related issues may also play a role in cancer disparities (White-Means and Osmani, 2017). Consider the information most useful to each diverse group

Below you will find considerations for specific audiences, including: Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders [AANHPI], and American Indian/Alaska Native [AI/AN] and LGBTQ individuals. 
It is important to tailor communication to these populations of focus with messaging that also addresses conditions where these communities live, learn, work and play, as these factors can impact a wide range of health risks and outcomes (CDC, 2021).

Black persons have the highest CRC rates of any racial/ethnic group in the U.S. and CRC is expected to be the third leading cause of cancer death in this group (American Cancer Society [ACS], 2019). From 2012-2016, CRC incidence rates in Black persons were about 20% higher than White persons and death rates were almost 40% higher than White persons (ACS, 2020). Among those ages 50 to 75 years, 65.3% of Black persons were up to date with CRC screening compared to 67.9% of White persons (Sabatino et al., 2021).
 
These disparities may be partially attributed to differences in exposure to risk factors (i.e., smoking, obesity) and health care access (ACS, 2020). Black individuals are less likely to receive timely follow-up of a positive screening test and/or a high-quality colonoscopy (ACS, 2019, 2020). The lack of health insurance coverage for early diagnosis and/or receipt of timely and high-quality care also negatively impacts health outcomes for this group (Sineshaw et al., 2018). Key screening barriers for this group include delaying due to cost and/or concerns with preparation for screening procedures (NCCRT, 2019); therefore, messaging about alternative tests that are affordable may have a positive impact on future behavior (NCCRT, 2019).  
 
Hispanic persons as a group overall have a lower CRC incidence and death rate compared to White persons (ACS, 2021). However, CRC is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among Hispanic men and third most commonly diagnosed cancer among Hispanic women (Miller et al., 2021).  In states such as Texas and California, “U.S. born Hispanic men have CRC death rates that approach or surpass those of White men due to acculturation” (ACS, 2021, pg.11). There is also wide variation in CRC cancer death rates between Hispanic origin groups, such as Cubans vs Mexicans (Miller et al., 2021). In terms of screening, 2018 data reveal that 57.6% of Hispanic persons age 50 to 75 years were up to date with CRC screening compared to 67.9% of White persons (Sabatino et al., 2021).
 
Differences in country of origin and acculturation, the process in which immigrants adopt the cultures and behaviors of a host country, affect health outcomes for Hispanic persons (ACS, 2021). Immigrants to the U.S. and the following generation may take on behaviors that can increase their risk of colorectal cancer (ACS, 2021). Top screening barriers for this group are primarily avoidance of screening driven by fear or being too busy due to work or childcare responsibilities (NCCRT, 2019, p. 39). Messages that focus on presenting easy, at-home screening options may address fear and time concerns (NCCRT, 2019, p.39). Since 51% of Hispanic persons visit their doctors for preventive care, messaging that encourages individuals to talk to their doctor about screening options may also be helpful for this group (NCCRT, 2019, p. 40). 
 
As a group overall, AANHPI individuals have the lowest CRC incidence and mortality compared to other racial/ethnic groups (ACS, 2020). However, within the group itself, CRC is the second most common cancer, with only 58.1% % of adults ages 50 to 75 years up to date with their CRC screening, compared to 67.9% % for White persons (Sabatino et al., 2021).  The grouping of AANHPI statistics most likely masks differences in health outcomes by subgroup. According to data collected from a California study, both Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders and Southeast Asians had the highest overall mortality rates for CRC compared to other subgroups (Medina et al., 2021). Furthermore, higher CRC incidence rates among U.S. born AANHPI individuals compared to their foreign counterparts may be partially attributed to acculturation, the process in which immigrants adopt the cultures and behaviors of a host country (Ladabaum et al., 2014).
 
Primary barriers to screening for this group are lack of symptoms and screening delays due to fears about screening procedures (NCCRT, 2019, p. 41). Lack of awareness and cultural/language barriers also contribute to low CRC screening rates (NCCRT, 2017). Messaging should provide information on alternate screening options to reduce fears and communicate the urgency of testing “right now” (NCCRT, 2019, p.41). Furthermore, providers can see AANHPI individuals to be healthier than they actually are, therefore, messaging should encourage providers to recommend CRC screening (NCCRT, 2017).
 
CRC is the second most common cancer in AI/AN people, with the incidence of CRC 41% higher than that of White persons (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021). AI/AN living in Alaska have the highest CRC incidence rates followed by AI/AN living in the Southern Plains (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021). Additionally, only 54.7% of AI/AN adults ages 50-75 years were up to date with CRC screening compared to 67.9% of White persons (Sabatino et al., 2021). Coupled with the lack of endoscopic services in Alaska, screening and monitoring high-risk patients is limited (Day et al., 2011).
 
For AI/AN populations, access to screening is limited by availability of local healthcare services in a specific region, insurance coverage, transportation, time concerns and cultural barriers (National Native Network, 2015). Therefore, stool-based testing is often the most accessible CRC screening option at rural, tribal run health care facilities, which may be a useful strategy to increase CRC screening among AI/AN people (Haverkamp et al., 2020).
 
Messages that focus on provider recommendations may be influential in getting AI/AN patients to complete colorectal cancer screening (American Indian Cancer Foundation, 2013). In addition to providing information on alternate CRC screening options, communications that also feature cancer survivors who used a local dialect and simplified language are preferred (Frerichs et al., 2018). View “Resources” below for more communication materials from various Tribes and Tribal organizations.
 
For LGBTQ individuals ages 50-75 years, 75% of gay or lesbian individuals were up to date with CRC screening compared to 67% of straight individuals (Sabatino et al., 2021).  In contrast, transgender women and gender-nonconforming individuals were less likely to be up-to-date with CRC screening compared to cisgender individuals (Tabaac et al., 2018).
 
The LGBTQ population may face increased barriers in accessing care to due to lack of health insurance coverage, fear of discrimination and/or negative experiences with healthcare providers (NCCRT, 2019). Additional barriers include stigma and fear of sharing their LGBTQ identity to a provider (NCCRT, 2019). Gender expansive survivors, individuals who identify as transgender, genderqueer/gender nonconforming, non-binary and another gender identity, were two times as likely not to share their identity to healthcare providers compared with cisgender survivors (National LGBT Cancer Network, 2021). Furthermore, many individuals rely on referrals from other LGBTQ survivors or visit multiple providers in order to receive culturally appropriate care, causing delays in cancer care (National LGBT Cancer Network, 2021).
 
Thus, communication efforts should emphasize finding a provider that LGBTQ individuals are comfortable with. View the “Resources” table below for information on finding LGBTQ-welcoming screening providers. Messaging that highlights the impact of gender identity on CRC screening and risk factors may also be helpful for this group.

Colorectal Cancer Resources

Resource

Description

American Cancer Society Cancer Facts for Gay and Bisexual Men

The American Cancer Society has assembled a list of important cancer facts for Gay and Bisexual Men, including information on colorectal cancer.

American Cancer Society- Resuming Cancer Screening During COVID-19

This report summarizes the current situation with COVID-19 and colorectal cancer, and provides guidance on how to deliver cancer screenings safely and effectively during the pandemic.

American Indian Cancer Foundation: Colorectal Cancer Awareness 

This foundation provides culturally-tailored infographics, toolkits and webinars to raise awareness of colorectal cancer among AI populations. 

Clinician’s Reference: Stool-Based Tests for Colorectal Cancer Screening

This resource introduces clinicians to the value of stool-based testing for colorectal cancer and explains the different types available.

Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP)

The purpose of CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) is to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among people between 45 and 75 years of age by implementing evidence-based interventions described in the Guide to Community Preventive Services (the Community Guide) and other supporting strategies in partnership with health systems. They also provide follow-up services for a limited number of program-eligible people.

Colorectal Cancer: Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging

Find out how colorectal cancer is tested for, diagnosed, and staged with this webpage from the American Cancer Society.

Colon Cancer Videos

The videos in this collection explain colon cancer risk factors, screening tests, treatments, and personal stories from survivors.

Colorectal Cancer Screening in American Indian & Alaska Native Communities

This webinar, recorded on November 28, 2017, explored the opportunities and barriers related to delivering quality colorectal cancer screening and follow-up care in health care settings serving American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems

This source provides advice on the design and delivery of effective colorectal cancer screening interventions to strengthen overall efforts.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Profiles The documents included in this resource show colorectal screening rates in the United States/ Puerto Rico by race, ethnicity, age, insurance status, sex, and more.
Colorectal Cancer Screening: What to Expect Learn about three screening methods that can reduce risk of colorectal cancer: colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, and home stool test.
Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan Tip Sheet: Colorectal Cancer This source from the American Cancer Society provides guidance on updating colorectal cancer screening in comprehensive cancer control plans, including information on engaging key partners, identifying data sources to measure efforts, and discussion questions surrounding colorectal cancer and screening.
GW Cancer Center: Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) Training This training aims to improve health equity by supporting organizational changes at the systems level. The training will help organizations implement quality improvements to advance equitable, accessible and patient-centered cancer care through improved patient-provider communication, cultural sensitivity, shared decision-making and attention to health literacy.
My CT Colonography Center Locator Tool The American College of Radiology (ACR) offers the My CT Colonography Center online locator, a patient-friendly online tool to find a computed tomography (CT) colonography screening center near you.
National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable: Screening During COVID-19 This resource is an action-oriented playbook to be used throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to advocate for colorectal cancer screening efforts.
National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) Learning Center The new NCCRT Learning Center is a digital learning platform which features courses, tools and other resources on colorectal cancer screening delivery and research. 
National LGBT Cancer Network Cancer Cards: English and Spanish Versions These cards aim to raise awareness about colorectal, breast, lung, and cervical cancer among members of the LGBTQ+ community. There are also cards that address the need for taking care of an individual’s physical and mental health. Each bundle includes the front and the back of the cards in PDF format.
National LGBT Cancer Network OUT: The National Cancer Survey The National LGBT Cancer Network released the findings from this survey in a report that provides information on experiences of LGBTQI cancer survivors and patients. Survey also includes a Special Sub-report on Gender Expansive Findings. 
National LGBT Cancer Network Provider Databases Directory of LGBTQ-welcoming cancer screening and treatment facilities across the U.S.  
New Hampshire Colorectal Cancer Screening Program (NHCRCSP) Patient Navigation Model Replication Manual  The NHCRCSP patient navigation model has been highly effective in increasing the completion and quality of colonoscopy screening and surveillance among statewide underserved groups. Patients in this program, all of whom were navigated, were 11 times more likely to complete colonoscopy than non-navigated patients in a comparison group. Given this success, the CDC and the NHCRCSP worked together to develop a manual to help others replicate the model. The manual includes step-by-step instructions for implementing a screening navigation program, including a detailed navigation protocol, guidance on data collection, navigator training, and sample templates and tools.
Nuestras Voces Network & Buena Salud Club Cancer Screening Bilingual InfoCard: English and Spanish Versions Nuestras Voces Network released a bilingual print and digital InfoCard to remind everyone that is time to get back to screening for cancer prevention. The InfoCard provides information about getting screened for breast, cervical, colorectal (colon) cancers.  
Screen for Life Campaign Screen for Life is a CDC campaign to increase colorectal cancer screening among men and women ages 45 or older. The campaign provides free print materials (fact sheets, brochures, postcards, etc.), TV and radio PSAs, social media posts and images, and other materials in English and Spanish to inform men and women about the importance of colorectal cancer screening. 
Recommended Messages to Reach Asian Americans-Asian Americans and Colorectal Cancer This companion guide reviews what we know from market research about unscreened Asian Americans and introduces and explains new tested messages.
Resources to Share CDC offers scientifically accurate information about colorectal cancer in a variety of formats. 
Screen to Prevent (STOP) Colon Cancer The Screen to Prevent (STOP) Colon Cancer project works to raise colorectal cancer screening rates in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in California, Oregon, and Washington State using fecal immunochemical testing (FIT). 
State-By-State Colorectal Cancer Screening Landscape This resource is a snapshot of the colorectal cancer screening landscape in each state while also putting into context how the different states compare with each other in a range of areas. Includes information on coverage, screening rates and legislation. 
State Cancer Profiles The State Cancer Profiles website provides interactive graphics and maps to characterize the cancer burden across various geographic areas and demographic groups. It focuses on cancer sites for which there are evidence-based control interventions.
Tested Messages to Reach the Unscreened-Hispanics/Latinos and Colorectal Cancer This companion guide reviews what we know from market research about unscreened Hispanics/ Latinos and introduces and explains new tested messages.
What Can LGBT Communities Do to Advance Colorectal Cancer Screening? Learn four things you can do to support reaching colorectal cancer screening rates of 80% and higher in LGBT communities.
2019 Colorectal Cancer Screening Messaging Guidebook This guidebook shares the findings and recommendations from recent research to educate and mobilize those not being screened for colorectal cancer.

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Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Messages and Graphics

Twitter

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March is #ColorectalCancer Awareness Month! What can you do to reduce your risk of colorectal #cancer? Learn more: http://bit.ly/2Fjfs7t 

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Banner with two hands holding a heart. Text reads Approximately 149,500 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2021. If  you are 45 or older, talk to you doctor about screening today.

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There are several screening options available for #ColorectalCancer, including some affordable at-home options. Talk to your doc about getting screened: http://bit.ly/2H1dla2 

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#CancerCare Providers: Explain how #ColorectalCancer screening can reduce the risk of #colorectalcancer by detecting polyps that can be easily removed. Learn how to explain the benefits of screening: http://bit.ly/2FpPU7V

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Should you be screened for #ColorectalCancer? Check out this fact sheet and talk to your doctor: https://bit.ly/3yBxXwD

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#ColorectalCancer is the second most common #cancer among Asian Americans. Learn how to address this disparity and promote screening: https://bit.ly/3rEcgHz

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Image of Asian couple with text stating, Did you know? Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Talk to you doctor about screening today.

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Talking with your doctor about #ColorectalCancer screening may seem overwhelming. This @AmericanCancer Society resource can help guide your conversation: https://bit.ly/3e1Etn5

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Image of Black male doctor consulting with a patient. Text above image reads 45 is the new 50, talk to you doctor about options for colorectal cancer screening.

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Don’t take chances with #ColorectalCancer! Get informed about the risk factors: https://bit.ly/326xPJU

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These testimonies are a reminder that getting screened for #ColorectalCancer could save your life: http://bit.ly/2ADHo24

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Images of different people of color for colorectal cancer awareness month

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How can you get #ColorectalCancer screening rates up in your community? Start by learning how your state measures up: http://bit.ly/2Rk05C5 #80inEveryCommunity

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#CancerCare Physicians: Your recommendation matters when it comes to getting  patients screened for #ColorectalCancer. Here’s how to optimize screening at your practice: https://bit.ly/3FbI2D6

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#Colorectalcancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death among Black persons. If you are 45 and older, ask your doctor about screening: https://bit.ly/3False1

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Image of Black man standing with hands in pocket. Text box next to him reads colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among Black persons. If you are 45 or older, talk to you doctor about screening

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About 40% of Hispanic middle-aged adults is not getting #colorectalcancer tested as recommended. Learn more about this disparity and how to prevent it: https://bit.ly/2Nc8SVx

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#AmericanIndians and #AlaskaNative persons are more likely to get colorectal cancer compared to White persons in most regions. This @NCCRTnews webinar explores barriers related to delivering screening in these communities: https://bit.ly/3yzsIhb

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#Providers, implicit bias can affect how you practice and recommend #colorectalcancer screening and follow up care. Check out @GWCancer’s TEAM training on recognizing implicit bias: https://bit.ly/30IiDSm

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#CancerCare Providers: Reassure your patients about the importance of resuming #colorectalcancer screening during #COVID19: https://bit.ly/3E4eFRF

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#CancerCare Providers: During #COVID19, prioritize those most at-risk for #colorectalcancer complications from delayed care: http://bit.ly/3uqq3ns

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For those at average risk for #COVID19, there are several safe options for at-home #colorectalcancer testing: http://bit.ly/3rlA3fA

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#LGBTQ folks, if you are 45 or older, talk to your doctor about #colorectalcancer screening. Find a LGBTQ-welcoming provider to help you decide which screening option is right for you: https://bit.ly/3t23BTA

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  4. Tap the post box. This box is at the top of the News Feed. If you're posting to a group, you'll find the box just below the cover photo. There will generally be a phrase like "Write something" or "What's on your mind?" in the box.
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March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. It’s the second leading cause of cancer death for men and women combined, but there are ways to lower your risk: http://bit.ly/2Fjfs7t 

Banner with two hands holding a heart. Text reads Approximately 149,500 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2021. If  you are 45 or older, talk to you doctor about screening today.

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A colonoscopy is one of several screening tests for colorectal cancer. Some can even be done from the comfort of your home at a low cost. Talk to your doctor to learn more about getting screened: http://bit.ly/2H1dla2 

Image of woman working on computer. Pop out circles lists information on different types of colorectal cancer screening tests.

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Providers, explain how colorectal cancer screening can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer through the detection and removal of precancerous polyps. This course can help you explain the benefits of screening to your patients: http://bit.ly/2FpPU7V

Image of female doctor pointing up to a comment bubble

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Screening for colorectal cancer can raise a lot of questions. This fact sheet from CDC can help you start a conversation with your doctor: https://bit.ly/3yBxXwD

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Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Asian Americans. Learn more on how to address this disparity and promote colorectal screening in this demographic: https://bit.ly/3rEcgHz

Image of Asian couple with text stating, Did you know? Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Talk to you doctor about screening today.

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Preparation is key when it comes to colorectal cancer screening. This American Cancer Society resource can help you start the conversation with your doctor and decide which screening test is right for you: https://bit.ly/3e1Etn5

Image of male Black doctor consulting with a Black patient. Text above reads 45 is the new 50, talk to you doctor about options for colorectal cancer screening

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Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month is a great opportunity to brush up on your knowledge of risk factors for colorectal cancer. Get informed: https://bit.ly/326xPJU

Image of colon and arrows pointing out indicating different risk factors for colorectal cancer

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Getting screened for colorectal cancer could save your life! Learn from others who have been screened: http://bit.ly/2ADHo24

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We could save lives if more adults were screened as recommended for colorectal cancer. How does your state measure up? http://bit.ly/2Rk05C5

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#CancerCare Physicians: Your recommendation matters when it comes to getting patients screened for #ColorectalCancer. Here’s how to optimize screening at your practice: https://bit.ly/3FbI2D6

Image of two providers, with text sharing information on CDC training on recommending colorectal cancer screenings.

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Colorectal cancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death among Black persons. If you are 45 and older, here are questions to ask your doctor about screening: https://bit.ly/3False1

Image of Black man standing with hands in pocket. Text box next to him reads colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among Black persons. If you are 45 or older, talk to you doctor about screening

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About 40% of Hispanic adults between 50 and 75 years old is not getting screened for colorectal cancer as recommended. Learn more about this group’s unique barriers to screening and how to close this disparity gap: https://bit.ly/2Nc8SVx

Image of Hispanic man and woman on the computer

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American Indians and Alaska Native persons are more likely to get colorectal cancer compared to White persons in most regions. This @NCCRTnews webinar explores barriers related to delivering screening in these communities: https://bit.ly/3yzsIhb

Image of American Indian woman

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Providers, implicit bias can affect how you practice and recommend colorectal cancer screening and follow up care. Check out GW Cancer Center’s Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) training to learn more about recognizing implicit bias: https://bit.ly/30IiDSm

Image of female doctor speaking to a patient

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Healthcare Providers: Despite the challenges from COVID-19, reassure your patients on the importance of resuming colorectal cancer screening, even during the pandemic: https://bit.ly/3E4eFRF

Image of patient speaking to a doctor via webcam

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Healthcare Providers: During the COVID-19 pandemic, prioritize those most at-risk for colorectal cancer complications from delayed care and those without access to telehealth services: http://bit.ly/3uqq3ns
Image of female doctor speaking to a patient

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For those at average or increased risk for COVID-19, there are several safe options for at-home colorectal cancer testing: http://bit.ly/3rlA3fA
Image of older woman on her phone at home

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LGBTQ folks, if you are 45 or older, talk to your doctor about colorectal cancer screening. Find a LGBTQ-welcoming provider to help you decide which screening option is right for you: https://bit.ly/3t23BTA
Image of two LGBTQ identifying women at home

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LinkedIn

How to Post on LinkedIn
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  5. Tap "Photo" from the top of the post screen, then select the downloaded graphic to upload and tap "Done." Doing so adds the photo to your post.
  6. Tap "Post." It's in the the bottom-right. Doing so will create your post and add it to the page you're on.
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Healthcare Providers: March is a great time to brush up on best practices for colorectal cancer screening. These courses from CDC and Medscape provide continuing education credits and are intended for primary care providers or other health care professionals: http://bit.ly/2Q9VrX2
Image of Black male doctor working on computer

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Healthcare Providers: Check out this resource from the National Cancer Institute to learn about the latest evidence-based information about colorectal cancer screening: http://bit.ly/3uqIp7Q

Image of female doctor on her phone

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Providers, check out this factsheet from the American Cancer Society about colorectal cancer and its risk factors, risk reduction, and treatment: https://bit.ly/3pM78km

Image of pair of hands holding blue cancer ribbon

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Healthcare Providers: Colorectal cancer screening can save lives, but only if individuals get tested. During the COVID-19 pandemic, utilize telehealth services and promote at-home testing to reach populations at-risk for both COVID-19 and colorectal cancer: http://bit.ly/36DWDrK

Image of Black male doctor waving in front of a computer

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Healthcare Providers: As your practice returns to providing in-person colorectal cancer screening, follow these guidelines from the CDC to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission and ensure safe screening: http://bit.ly/33VpR3U

Graphic of various providers, with text above stating: Planning and staying prepared for community spread of COVID-19 is critical for maintaining healthcare services during the pandemic.

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Healthcare Providers: Despite the challenges we face during the COVID-19 pandemic, reducing the risk of colorectal cancer remains a public health priority. Learn more from the American Cancer Society on providing safe opportunities to screen for colorectal cancers during the pandemic: https://bit.ly/2LfLndz

Image of crowd of people wearing masks. Text box next to image reads: providers, how are you promoting colorectal cancer screening during the COVID-19 pandemic?

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Instagram

How to Post on Instagram
  1. Download the suggested graphic.
  2. Highlight the corresponding message with your cursor. Right click and select "Copy."
  3. Open Instagram. If you aren't already logged in, enter your username (or phone number) and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap the plus sign box. This box is at the top right. Select the downloaded graphic or drag it into the box to upload it.
  5. Select "Square (1:1)" for the aspect ratio, then click "Next."
  6. Ignore the filters screen, then click "Next" again.
  7. Paste the caption where it says, "Write a caption..." at the top.
  8. Under "Accessibility," consider adding alt text to describe the photo for people with visual impairments.
  9. Tap "Share." It's in the bottom-right corner of the screen.
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March is #ColorectalCancer Awareness Month. It’s the second leading cause of cancer death for men and women combined, but there are ways to lower your risk. Visit cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal for more information. 

Banner with two hands holding a heart. Text reads Approximately 149,500 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2021. If  you are 45 or older, talk to you doctor about screening today.

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A colonoscopy is one of several screening tests for colorectal cancer. Some can even be done from the comfort of your home at a low cost. Talk to your doctor to learn more about getting screened. Visit cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal for information on screening tests. 

Image of woman working on computer. Pop out circles lists information on different types of colorectal cancer screening tests.

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#Providers, explain how #colorectalcancer screening can reduce the risk of cancer through the detection and removal of precancerous polyps. Visit cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/quality to access a free training to improve #colorectalcancer screening in your practice. 

Image of female doctor pointing up to a comment bubble asking: Providers, how often do you recommend colorectal cancer screening to your patients 45 and older?

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Screening for colorectal cancer can raise a lot of questions. A fact sheet from @CDCgov to help you start a conversation with your doctor. Check out cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal for more information. 

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Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Asian Americans. Learn more on how to address this disparity and promote colorectal screening in this demographic by visiting nccrt.org/resource-center

Image of Asian couple with text stating, Did you know? Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Talk to you doctor about screening today.

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Talking with your doctor about #ColorectalCancer screening may seem overwhelming. Visit @AmericanCancerSociety for more information on screening tests at cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer

Image of male Black doctor consulting with a Black patient. Text above reads 45 is the new 50, talk to you doctor about options for colorectal cancer screening

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Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month is a great opportunity to brush up on your knowledge of risk factors for colorectal cancer. Get informed by visiting cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/

Image of colon and arrows pointing out indicating different risk factors for colorectal cancer

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Getting screened for colorectal cancer could save your life! Learn from others who have been screened at cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/stories

Pictures of people of color surrounding text box stating colorectal cancer awareness month

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How can you get #ColorectalCancer screening rates up in your community? Start by learning how your state measures up. Visit cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/screening-test-use. #80inEveryCommunity.

Image of U.S. map with different pin points. There's an overlay image of colorectal cancer ribbon and image of data

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#CancerCare Physicians: Your recommendation matters when it comes to getting patients screened for #ColorectalCancer. To optimize screening at your practice, visit cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/quality for free trainings. 

Image of two providers, with text sharing information on CDC training on recommending colorectal cancer screenings.

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#Colorectalcancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death among Black persons. If you are 45 and older, ask your doctor about screening. For questions to ask your doctor, visit cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal for more information. 

Image of Black man standing with hands in pocket. Text box next to him reads colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among Black persons. If you are 45 or older, talk to you doctor about screening

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About 40% of Hispanic adults between 50 and 75 years old is not getting screened for colorectal cancer as recommended. Learn more about this group’s unique barriers to screening and how to close this disparity gap at nccrt.org/resource/hispanicslatinos-colorectal-cancer-companion-guide

Image of Hispanic man and woman on the computer

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American Indians and Alaska Native persons are more likely to get colorectal cancer compared to White persons in most regions. Visit nccrt.org/resources for resources on addressing colorectal cancer screening among these communities.  

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Providers, #implicit #bias can affect how you practice and recommend #colorectalcancer screening and follow up care. Check out GW Cancer Center’s Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) training on recognizing implicit bias at gwccacademy.com

Image of female doctor speaking to a patient

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Healthcare Providers: Despite the challenges from COVID-19, reassure your patients on the importance of resuming colorectal cancer screening, even during the pandemic. Visit acs4ccc.org for more guidance on cancer screening during COVID-19.  

Image of patient speaking to a doctor via webcam

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Healthcare Providers: During the COVID-19 pandemic, prioritize those most at-risk for colorectal cancer complications from delayed care and those without access to telehealth services. Visit nccrt.org/resource and check out the resource on Reigniting Colorectal Cancer Screening As Communities Face and Respond to COVID-19 Pandemic: A Playbook. 
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For those at average or increased risk for COVID-19, there are several safe options for at-home colorectal cancer testing. Read more at cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer.
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#LGBTQ folks, if you are 45 or older, talk to your doctor about #colorectalcancer screening. @lgbtcancernetwork can help you find a LGBTQ-welcoming provider to help you decide which screening option is right for you. Visit cancer-network.org/providerdatabases for more information.

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Social media management tools like Hootsuite and Sprout Social offer bulk scheduling options for uploading multiple messages at once. The spreadsheets below can be adapted to fit multiple scheduling platforms or services. They are currently formatted to work with Sprout Social's bulk scheduling option. Please review the bulk scheduling format requirements for your specific platform before posting. Messages are sorted by network.

Download All Twitter Messages

Download All Facebook Messages

Download All LinkedIn Messages

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If you would like to download all images in this social media toolkit, click on each network below for a zip file with each network's graphics. Please note that these image sizes are slightly smaller than the links above due to file size limitations. If you would like to download full resolution versions, simply click on the "Download Graphic" link below each image in the message tables above.

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References

American Cancer Society (2016). Special Section: Cancer in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2016. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2016.html

American Cancer Society (2019). Cancer Facts & Figures for African Americans 2019-2021. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2019. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/cancer-facts-figures-for-african-americans.html

American Cancer Society (2020). Colorectal Cancer Facts and Figures 2020-2022. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2020. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/colorectal-cancer-facts-and-figures/colorectal-cancer-facts-and-figures-2020-2022.pdf

American Cancer Society (2021). Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanic/Latino People 2021-2023. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2021. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/hispanics-latinos-facts-figures.html

American Indian Foundation (2013). Improving Northern Plains American Indian Colorectal Cancer Screening (INPACS) Project Report. Retrieved from https://www.americanindiancancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/INPACS-Report_2013_final.pdf

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). About Social Determinants of Health (SDOH). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/about.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/screening/tests.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). What Are the Symptoms of Colorectal Cancer? Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/symptoms.htm

Cutrona, S. L., Roblin, D. W., Wagner, J. L., Gaglio, B., Williams, A. E., Torres Stone, R., Field, T. S., & Mazor, K. M. (2013). Adult willingness to use email and social media for peer-to-peer cancer screening communication: Quantitative interview study. JMIR Research Protocols, 2(2), e52. http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/resprot.2886 

Day, L.W., Espey, D. K., Madden, E., Segal, M., & Terdiman, J. P. (2011). Screening Prevalence and Incidence of Colorectal Cancer Among American Indian/Alaskan Natives in the Indian Health Service. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 56(7), 2104–2113. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-010-1528-3

Dillard, A. J. & Main, J. L. (2013). Using a health message with a testimonial to motivate colon cancer screening: Associations with perceived identification and vividness. Health Education and Behavior, 40(6), 673-682. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1090198112473111

Frerichs, L., Rhode, J., Bell, R., Hunt, C., Lowery, J., Brooks, M., Beasley, C., & Reuland, D. (2018). Perspectives of American Indians in Eastern North Carolina on Socio-cultural Factors that Influence Colorectal Cancer Screening Decisions. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 29(2), 723–742. https://doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2018.0055

Haverkamp, D., English, K., Jacobs-Wingo, J., Tjemsland, A., & Espey, D. (2020). Effectiveness of Interventions to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Preventing Chronic Disease, 17, E62–E62. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd17.200049 

Kadakuntla, A., Wang, T., Medgyesy, K., Rrapi, E., Litynski, J., Adynski, G., & Tadros, M. (2021). Colorectal cancer screening in the COVID-19 era. World journal of gastrointestinal oncology, 13(4), 238–251. https://doi.org/10.4251/wjgo.v13.i4.238

Kindratt, T.B., Atem, F., Dallo, F. J., Allicock, M., & Balasubramanian, B. A. (2020). The Influence of Patient–Provider Communication on Cancer Screening. Journal of Patient Experience, 7(6), 1648–1657. https://doi.org/10.1177/2374373520924993

Ladabaum, U., Clarke, C. A., Press, D. J., Mannalithara, A., Myer, P. A., Cheng, I., & Gomez, S. L. (2014). Colorectal cancer incidence in Asian populations in California: effect of nativity and neighborhood-level factors. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 109(4), 579–588. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2013.488

McQueen, A., Caburnay, C., Kreuter, M., & Sefko, J. (2019). Improving Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Intervention to Compare Screener vs. Survivor Narratives. Journal of Health Communication, 24(2), 141-155. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2019.1587109

Medina, H. N., Callahan, K. E., Morris, C. R., Thompson, C. A., Siweya, A., & Pinheiro, P. S. (2021). Cancer Mortality Disparities among Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Populations in California. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention: a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 30(7), 1387–1396. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1528

Meppelink, C. S., Smit, E. G., Buurman, B. M., & van Weert, J. C. M. (2015). Should we be afraid of simple messages? The effects of text difficulty and illustrations in people with low or high health literacy. Health Communication, 30(12), 1181-1189. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2015.1037425 

Miller, K.D., Ortiz, A.P., Pinheiro, P.S., Bandi, P., Minihan, A., Fuchs, H.E., Martinez Tyson, D., Tortolero-Luna, G., Fedewa, S.A., Jemal, A.M., Siegel, R.L. (2021).  Cancer statistics for the US Hispanic/Latino population, 2021. CA Cancer J Clin. 2021: 71: 466- 487. https://doi.org/10.3322/caac.21695

Nagelhout, E., Comarell, K., Samadder, N. J., & Wu, Y. P. (2017). Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in a racially diverse population served by a safety-net clinic. Journal of Community Health, 42(4), 791-796. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-017-0319-6 

National Cancer Institute. (2020). Cancer disparities. Retrieved August 11, 2021 from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/disparities

National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (2017). Recommended Messages to Reach Asian Americans-Companion Guide. http://nccrt.org/wp-content/uploads/CRC-Communications-Asian-American-Companion-Guide-Final_B.pdf

National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (2019). 2019 Colorectal Cancer Screening Message Guidebook. https://nccrt.org/resource/2019messagingguidebook/    

National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (2019). What Can Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Communities Do to Advance the Shared Goal to Screen 80% of Age-eligble Adults for Colorectal Cancer? http://nccrt.org/wp-content/uploads/dlm_uploads/80inEveryCommunity-LGBT-3.27.19.pdf

National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (2021). Achieving 80% Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in Every Community. https://nccrt.org/80-in-every-community/#:~:text=80%25%20in%20Every%20Community%20is,colorectal%20cancer%20screening%20rates%20nationally.

National LGBT Cancer Network (2021). OUT: The National Cancer Survey, Summary of Findings.  https://cancer-network.org/out-the-national-cancer-survey/

National Native Network (2015). Screening & Early Detection. Retrieved from https://keepitsacred.itcmi.org/cancer/screening-and-early-detection/

Sabatino S.A., Thompson T.D., White M.C., Shapiro, J.A., De Moor, J., Doria-Rose, P., Clarke, T., Richardson, L.C. (2021). Cancer Screening Test Receipt — United States, 2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2021; 70:29–35. http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm7002a1

Sineshaw, H. M., Ng, K., Flanders, W. D., Brawley, O. W., & Jemal, A. (2018). Factors That Contribute to Differences in Survival of Black vs White Patients With Colorectal Cancer. Gastroenterology, 154(4), 906–915.e7. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.11.005

Small, C., Raymond, V., Jacobstein, M., Lang, K. (2020). Abstract B051: Understanding patient-reported barriers to colorectal cancer screening: A literature review. B051-B051. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2020: 29(6 Suppl 2). http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.DISP19-B051

Tabaac, A. R., Sutter, M. E., Wall, C., & Baker, K. E. (2018). Gender Identity Disparities in Cancer Screening Behaviors. American journal of preventive medicine, 54(3), 385–393. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.11.009

U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). United States Cancer Statistics Working Group, U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool, based on 2020 submission data (1999-2018). Retrieved from https://gis.cdc.gov/Cancer/USCS/DataViz.html 

U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). United States Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool, based on 2020 submission data (1999-2018): American Indian and Alaska Native restricted to PRCDA only. Retrieved from https://gis.cdc.gov/Cancer/USCS/#/AIAN/

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (2021). Screening for colorectal cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA, 325(19),1965-1977. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2021.6238

Weaver, K.E., Ellis, S.D., Denizard-Thompson, N., Kronner, & D., Miller, D. (2015). Crafting appealing text messages to encourage colorectal cancer screening test completion: A qualitative study. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth.3(4), e100. http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.4651

White-Means, S., and Osmani, A. R. (2017). Racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication with breast cancer patients: Evidence from 2011 MEPS and experiences with cancer supplement. INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, 54, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1177/0046958017727104

Woudstra, A. J., & Suurmond, J. (2019). How narratives influence colorectal cancer screening decision making and uptake: A realist review. Health expectations: an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy, 22(3), 327–337. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12892
 

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