Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Campaign

November 12, 2021
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About Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month is an annual observance held throughout the Month of January. It is intended to raise awareness of cervical cancer and to promote research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship and cure. 

Data and Statistics

In 2018, the latest year for which incidence data are available, in the United States, 12,733 people were diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,138 people died of this cancer (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021). For every 100,000 women, eight new cervical cancer cases were reported and two people died of this cancer (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021).

Screening with cytology (Pap smear) and/or for the Human papilloma virus (HPV) (depending on age); and HPV vaccination are proven tools for reducing the burden of cervical cancer in the United States. Health care providers are integral in recommending both of these preventative actions to individuals with a cervix and parents of children old enough for the HPV vaccine.

Screening

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (2018) recommends that individuals with a cervix aged 21-29 get cervical cancer screening with cytology alone every three years, while individuals aged 30-65 are recommended to screen every three years with cytology alone, every five years with HPV testing alone, or every five years with co-testing (HPV testing in combination with cytology).

Cervical cancer screening rates in the U.S. are generally high, yet certain under-resourced groups experience disparities in screening and surveillance (Fuzzell et al., 2021). Health care providers are central sources of information about cervical cancer screening for patients, and their involvement is often an important factor in influencing screening coverage (Musa et al., 2017).

Despite successes in cervical cancer risk reduction through screening and vaccination, racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in cervical cancer screening and diagnosis persist (Johnson et al., 2020). A 2017 national assessment of HPV and Pap tests using 2015 U.S. National Health Interview Survey data found that 20% of survey respondents had not been screened for cervical cancer in the past 3 years, translating to over 14 million women (Watson et al., 2017).

Providers should promote awareness of cervical cancer screening and remind all eligible patients to get screened, especially groups placed at a higher risk, including recent immigrants to the United States, women without insurance, and those without a usual source of healthcare (Watson et al., 2017).

HPV Vaccination

“Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical cancer, as well as some oropharyngeal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and anal cancers” (Van Dyne et al., 2018). HPV vaccination could prevent more than 90% of cancers caused by HPV—an estimated 33,000 cases every year—from ever developing (CDC, 2020). The CDC recommends two doses of HPV vaccine for all individuals aged 11 or 12 years (Meites, Kempe & Markowitz, 2016). Catch-up HPV vaccination is recommended for all persons through age 26 years who are not adequately vaccinated (Meites et al., 2019). For persons initiating vaccination before their 15th birthday, three does of HPV vaccine are recommended. Parents’ interactions with health care providers can impact their decision to vaccinate their children. A health care provider’s recommendation is the single biggest predictor of whether or not a parent will vaccinate their child against HPV-related cancers (CDC, 2019). 

Best Practices for Communicating About Cervical Cancer

Emphasize screening information and follow-up reminders

  • Improve knowledge of Pap Smear (cytology) and HPV screening for cervical cancer. Educational campaigns such as CDC’s Inside Knowledge campaign can improve patient and provider knowledge of Pap smear and HPV screening for cervical cancer. Tools, resources and graphics can be found at CDC's Cervical Cancer Resources to Share
  • Promote information on cervical cancer screening recommendations.
  • Remind providers to promote screening as part of cervical cancer prevention.
  • Promote awareness of cervical cancer screening particularly for populations placed at greatest risk 
  • Remind patients to get screened for cervical cancers and encourage them to ask about screening recommendations at appointments.
  • Emphasize the importance of not delaying care if an abnormal lesion is identified.

Remind providers about the importance of talking about HPV vaccination as cervical cancer prevention

  • Improve knowledge of HPV-related cancers. Educational campaigns such as CDC’s Inside Knowledge campaign can improve patient and provider knowledge of HPV-associated gynecologic cancers. Tools, resources and graphics can be found at CDC's Cervical Cancer Resources to Share.
  • Promote HPV vaccination as cervical cancer prevention.
  • Remind providers about the importance of talking about HPV vaccination with parents of adolescents.
  • High-quality provider recommendations are strongly associated with increased HPV vaccinations (Gilkey et al., 2016). Providers’ recommendations about HPV vaccination should be strong, timely (when individuals are in the recommended 11-12 age range for vaccination), consistent with other vaccine recommendations, and urgent.
  • Use pre-written recommendation scripts for ideas on how to make an effective recommendation for HPV vaccination such as “Today your child should have vaccines for three different diseases. They’re designed to protect them from meningitis, HPV cancers, and whooping cough” (American Cancer Society, 2020).

When communicating about HPV vaccination to parents, it is important to: 

  • Recommend the HPV vaccine in the same way and on the same day as all adolescent vaccines (CDC, 2019).
  • Take the time to listen and understand parents’ concerns (CDC, 2019).
  • Strongly recommend the HPV vaccine by saying that the vaccine is important and that is reduces the risk of several cancers, including cervical cancer (Gilkey et al., 2016).
  • Assume parents will vaccinate their children instead of giving the impression that the HPV vaccine is unnecessary (Reno et al., 2019).
  • Use motivational interviewing (MI) and fact sheets with parents who are vaccine-hesitant (Reno et al., 2019). MI strengthens a person’s motivation to change their behavior based on their own goals and values (American Psychological Association, 2020). MI should inform parents about the HPV vaccine according to their specific needs and their individual level of knowledge, while also respecting their beliefs (Gagneur, 2020).
     

Communicating with Diverse Audiences

Certain groups experience disparities in cervical cancer screening, incidence, mortality, and survival (National Cancer Institute, 2020). Cancer health disparities are complex and affected by various factors, such as, social determinants of health, behavior, biology, genetics, and more (National Cancer Institute, 2020). Communication-related issues may also play a role in cancer disparities (White-Means and Osmani, 2017). Consider the information most useful to each diverse group.

Despite widely available screening tests and vaccinations, racial and ethnic disparities in cervical cancer survival rates continue to exist (Johnson et al., 2020). More Black and Hispanic individuals are put at higher risk for getting HPV-associated cervical cancer than other races or ethnicities, possibly because of decreased access to screening tests or follow-up treatment (CDC, 2020). Additionally, cultural differences and mistrust of the health care system may play a role in individuals choosing not to use preventive services (Dalton & Farley, 2017). Therefore, it is important to tailor communication to these populations of focus with messaging that also addresses conditions where these communities live, learn, work and play, as these factors can impact a wide range of health risks and outcomes (CDC, 2021).

 Below you will find considerations for specific audiences, including: Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders [AANHPI], and American Indian/Alaskan Native [AI/AN] and Transmasculine Individuals. 

In 2018, 1,960 new cases of cervical cancer were reported among Black women, and 770 Black women died of this cancer (U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, 2021); which results in Black women having the highest death rate from this disease. Additionally, Black women reported higher cervical cancer screening rates than White women, but lower rates of being informed of an abnormal Pap test and contacted by their provider for follow up treatment (Ford et al., 2021). Research suggests that Black persons continue to face barriers to accessing high quality, patient-centered care, specifically relating to specialty care, medical tests, and patient-provider communication (Mitchell et al., 2020). Create messages recognizing the influence of provider implicit bias. Additionally, communication efforts focusing on clear patient-provider communication, culturally-appropriate education and interventions may be useful for this group (Ford et al., 2021).
Hispanic women are 40% more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer compared to White women (Office of Minority Health, 2021). Hispanic women also had lower screening rates compared to White and Black women (Watson et al., 2017). However, among Hispanic adolescents ages 13-17, starting and finishing the HPV vaccination series is higher compared to White adolescents, and this was highly attributed to provider recommendations (American Cancer Society, 2018). Therefore, messaging should continue to encourage providers to recommend the HPV vaccine to Hispanic youth. Furthermore, identifying and understanding cultural elements that work best with particular Hispanic communities can be an effective way to promote cervical cancer screening (Nuestras Voces, 2019). Studies indicate that a cultural narrative/storytelling approach is effective in reducing disparities in cervical cancer among Hispanic women (Baezconde-Garbanati et al., 2014). 
Compared to other racial groups, Asian American women overall have lower screening rates for cervical cancer (Lee et al., 2021). While cervical cancer incidence is slightly lower for AANHPI women overall compared to White women, rates among Cambodian Americans and Vietnamese Americans are 40-87% higher (Lee et al., 2021). Factors such as HPV prevalence in a person’s country of origin, immigration, and lower rates of Pap testing can affect these rates (Lee et al., 2021). Therefore, communication efforts for this group should be tailored to the context of specific sub-ethnic groups within the AANHPI community as well as use cultural- and language-appropriate approaches. 
AI/AN women experience higher cervical cancer incidence compared to White women, specifically the Northern Plains, Alaska, Southern Plains, and Pacific Coast regions (Melknonian et al., 2019). Additionally, 71.1% of AI/AN adolescents ages 13-17 received their HPV vaccine compared to 68.3% of White adolescents (Office of Minority Health, 2020), thus, communications efforts should continue to focus on HPV vaccination and preventive health care services for these individuals. Furthermore, AI/AN cultures have distinct practices for health, medicine and healing; cultural values and social norms about cervical cancer and screening should be considered when tailoring screening services for these populations (Lee et al., 2021). 
Transmasculine individuals face disparities in cervical cancer screening rates compared to non-transgender women (McDowell, 2018). Trans people with cervixes were 60% less likely to get cervical cancer screenings compared to cis women (Kasberg & National LGBT Cancer Network, 2019). Unique barriers to screening for this population are related to Pap tests, therefore, the introduction of alternative screening tests may help reduce these barriers (McDowell, 2018). Furthermore, transmasculine persons who trust their providers were more willing to undergo screening compared to those who did not have a positive provider relationship (McDowell, 2018). Communication efforts should emphasize finding a provider that they are comfortable with and recommend resources such as www.cancer-network.org/providerdatabases to find LGBTQ-welcoming screening providers (Kasberg & National LGBT Cancer Network, 2019). 
 

Cervical Cancer Resources

Resource

Description

“About HPV” American Cancer Society Videos

A playlist of videos about HPV from the American Cancer Society, including videos from survivors and caregivers.

ACS Guidance on Promoting HPV Vaccination during COVID-19

This resource summarizes the current state of research available and provides guidance on how health care providers can promote and deliver cancer screening appropriately, safely, and equitably during the COVID-19 pandemic.

CDC Resources on HPV

Various resources from the CDC providing information on HPV, the HPV vaccine and HPV-related cancers.

Genital HPV Infection Fact Sheet

About HPV Vaccines

HPV and Cancer 

Information on HPV

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Bilingual Infographics: English and Spanish 

These bilingual infographics highlight cervical cancer disparities, raise awareness, and emphasize the importance of screening. 

Cervical Cancer Screening Preferences Among Trans-Masculine Individuals

This study conducted interviews with transmasculine individuals on perceptions and experiences of cervical cancer screening. They found that self-collected frontal HPV swabs were the preferred method of cancer screening among the participants.

Cervical Cancer Quiz How much do you know about cervical cancer? Take this quiz from the CDC to find out. 
Cervical Cancer Resources to Share CDC offers scientifically accurate information about cervical cancer in a variety of formats, including tools, resources and graphics.  
Cervical Cancer Survivor Stories CDC published a collection of personal cervical cancer survivor stories. Their first-hand accounts offer important lessons for other women. 
Closing in on the Bull’s Eye: Moving from Volume to Value through HPV Vaccination

Published in the American Medical Group Association’s Group Practice Journal, this article by AMGA and the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable makes the case for why health systems hold the key to preventing and eliminating HPV cancers.

HPV IQ-Immunization Quality Improvement Tools

The site is designed for public health professionals and primary care providers who want to increase and improve the delivery of the HPV vaccine to adolescents. It provides evidence-based tools and strategies on quality improvement and communication training. 

HPV VAX NOW Campaign

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Office on Women's Health (OWH) developed the HPV VAX NOW campaign with the long-term goal of increasing HPV vaccination rates among young adults ages 18–26 living in Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas. The campaign aims to help young adults in these states recognize the importance of the HPV vaccine as well as helps providers effectively recommend the vaccine. Campaign web pages includes guidance, tips, resources and communication toolkits. 

If You Have It, Check It: Overcoming Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening with Patients on the Female-to-Male Transgender Spectrum

In this webinar, experts in the fields of medicine and research will share primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention strategies and will identify strategies that providers can use to address barriers to optimal screening and prevention in female-to-male patients. Please register for an account to access the webinar or view the webinar slides. 

Increasing HPV Vaccinations for LGBTQ+ Patients This free online course, offered by the Equality California Institute, outlines evidence-based, LGBTQ+ sensitive strategies for increasing HPV vaccination rates among adolescents. This curriculum engages and trains healthcare workers in evidence-based, LGBTQ+ sensitive practices to encourage HPV vaccination, and to increase HPV vaccination rates among LGBTQ+ populations, particularly transgender and gender-nonconforming youth. 
Inside Knowledge About Gynecologic Cancer Campaign This CDC campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies, so they can recognize any warning signs and seek medical care. 
National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP)

Through the NBCCEDP, CDC helps women with low incomes who are uninsured or underinsured gain access to timely breast and cervical cancer screening, diagnostic, and treatment services. NBCCEDP also provides patient navigation services to help women overcome barriers and get timely access to quality care. The National Report provides data on millions of women screened by the program over an 11-year period. 

National LGBT Cancer Network: Cervical Cancer Card This card aims to raise awareness about cervical cancer among members of the LGBTQ+ community. There are also cards that address the need for taking care of an individual’s physical and mental health.
Promising Practices for Adolescent Vaccination During COVID-19 Given the significant negative impact of COVID-19 on adolescent immunization rates, the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable hosted 2 webinars to share promising practices from the field.
Promoting Cervical Cancer Screenings During the COVID-19 Pandemic The American Cancer Society provides recommendations and messages to promote the importance of continued cervical cancer screening during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
GW Cancer Center: Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) Training This training aims to improve health equity by supporting organizational changes at the systems level. The training will help organizations implement quality improvements to advance equitable, accessible and patient-centered cancer care through improved patient-provider communication, cultural sensitivity, shared decision-making and attention to health literacy.
Us vs. HPV 2020 This webinar series is hosted by the American Medical Women's Association, Global Initiative Against HPV and Cervical Cancer, and Indiana University’s National Center of Excellence in Women's Health. The webinars are intended for members of the public, patients, healthcare providers, and anyone else who wishes to learn more about various aspects of HPV-related diseases and HPV prevention.
What Works: Increasing Cervical Cancer Screenings for Hispanics and AANHPI Communities This webinar, in collaboration with the Nuestras Voces Network, highlights resources to support efforts for cervical cancer education and prevention, and present examples of implemented interventions in Hispanic and Asian and Pacific Islander communities.

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Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Messages and Graphics

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We're kicking off #CervicalHealthMonth! Read about some ways you can reduce your risk of #CervicalCancer here: http://bit.ly/2yNSCkq

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Graphic with cervical cancer data taken from SEER and tips to raise awareness

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Almost all #CervicalCancer is caused by HPV. Talk to your doctor to see if the #HPVvax is right for you and your family.: http://bit.ly/2PY9LRu.

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Image of mom and dad with two kids with overlay text stating protect yourself and your loved ones. Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine.

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Learn from a provider about the importance of getting the #HPVvax from @CDCgov’s “Can I Ask You a Question?” video series here: https://bit.ly/3fXcxRu #CervicalHealthMonth

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Image of patient talking to her doctor about the HPV vaccine

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Parents: You are the key to closing the door to #CervicalCancer. Watch this video from @CDCgov’s “How I Recommend HPV Vaccine” series on the importance of #HPVvax: https://bit.ly/33CG5ij

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Did you know that you can reduce your risk of #CervicalCancer with regular screening tests and vaccination? http://bit.ly/2zMCHAX  

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#CervicalCancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 570,000 new cases worldwide in 2018. Learn how the #HPVVax can lower these rates: https://bit.ly/3myBx41

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Image of hands holding a globe with cervical cancer symbol. Text overlay reads that cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women globally. The HPV vaccine can lower this statistic.

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#Clinicians: Are you up-to-date on the current #HPVvax and #CervicalCancer screening recommendations? See here: http://bit.ly/2z5UlSX

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#Clinicians: Here are some tips and time-savers for talking with parents about #HPVvax:   http://bit.ly/HPVTipsTimesavers   #CervicalHealthMonth

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Looking for information on clinical trials for #CervicalCancer treatment? Check out this list from the National Cancer Institute: http://bit.ly/2CRdoDe

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Parents: Are your kids vaccinated against #CervicalCancer? @CDCgov & partners recommend #HPVvax for kids ages 11-12 (and even as early as ages 9-10). Find out more about recommended immunizations for your children:  http://bit.ly/2TfY07I

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Image of doctor talking to patient and her son. Overlay text reads Did you know? Children as young as ages 9-10 can receive the HPV vaccine if recommended by their provider.

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#HealthcareProviders: Ensure your adolescent patients are fully vaccinated by using these resources to help you make effective recommendations http://bit.ly/2OLVDWJ #HowIRecommend

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Image of Black female doctor. Overlay text reads: Providers, how does your practice routinely recommend HPV cancer risk reduction?

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It’s not just about you, it’s about your loved ones too. Learn more about #cervicalcancer from actress Cote de Pablo and @CDCgov:  http://bit.ly/2cLzsk3

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#HealthcareProviders: Patients who have a cervix, including transgender or gender non-conforming patients, should be screened according to national guidelines: https://bit.ly/3mKSusd #CervicalHealthMonth

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#CancerCare Providers: Despite #COVID19, it is important for patients to resume #CervicalCancer screening and #HPVvax. Follow these strategies from @AmericanCancer to get screening and #HPVvax back on track:  https://bit.ly/3C6EQq2

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Image of female doctor with googles and face mask. Text overlay emphasizes importance of resuming cervical cancer screening during a pandemic.

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Parents: Despite the challenges of #COVID19, it is important to keep your children up to date with the #HPVvax which can prevent #CervicalCancer: https://bit.ly/340372G

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Transmasculine persons with a cervix should talk to their doctor about #cervicalcancer screening and the #HPVvax. Find a LGBTQ-welcoming provider at  https://bit.ly/3F6LRJf

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Are you 26 or younger? Ask your doctor about the #HPV #vaccine to protect you against HPV-related #cancers. Learn more https://bit.ly/3ooJjzH

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Image of young, female Black teenager wearing yellow shirt. Text overlay reads Are you 26 or younger? Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine

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#Providers, implicit bias can affect how you practice and recommend #cervicalcancer screening and follow up care. Check out @GWCancer’s TEAM training on recognizing implicit bias: https://bit.ly/30IiDSm

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How to post on Facebook
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  3. Open Facebook. If you aren't already logged in, enter your email address (or phone number) and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap the post box. This box is at the top of the News Feed. If you're posting to a group, you'll find the box just below the cover photo. There will generally be a phrase like "Write something" or "What's on your mind?" in the box.
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We're kicking off Cervical Health Month! Read about some ways you can reduce your risk of Cervical Cancer here: http://bit.ly/2yNSCkq

Infographic displaying information on cervical cancer statistics and ways to prevent it

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Almost all cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus that can be passed from one person to another during sex. Learn more about HPV and other risk factors for cervical cancer: http://bit.ly/2PY9LRu

Image of mom and dad with two kids with overlay text stating protect yourself and your loved ones. Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine.

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Every year, 45,300 people are affected by HPV-related cancers, including cervical cancer. Learn from a provider about the importance of getting the HPV vaccine from CDC’s “Can I Ask You a Question?” series here: https://bit.ly/3fXcxRu

Image of patient talking to her doctor about the HPV vaccine

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Parents: You are the key to cervical and other HPV-causing cancer prevention. Watch this short video from CDC’s “How I Recommend HPV Vaccine” video series on the importance of the HPV vaccine: https://bit.ly/33CG5ij  

Image of Asian American mom and teenage daughter

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Two screening tests can help reduce the risk of cervical cancer or find it early: the Pap test and the HPV test. Knowledge is power! Read more about these screening options: http://bit.ly/2zMCHAX

Image of patient getting a vaccine from their doctor

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Cervical Cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 570,000 new cases worldwide in 2018. Learn how the #HPVVax can lower these rates: https://bit.ly/3myBx41  

Image of hands holding a globe with cervical cancer symbol. Text overlay reads that cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women globally. The HPV vaccine can lower this statistic.

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Attention Clinicians: current vaccination and screening recommendations for cervical cancer include individuals ages 11-12. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2z5UlSX

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Clinicians: Need some guidance on addressing common questions about the HPV vaccine? These tips and timesavers from CDC can help: http://bit.ly/HPVTipsTimesavers

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Looking for information on clinical trials for cervical cancer treatment?  Check out this list from the National Cancer Institute: http://bit.ly/2CRdoDe

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Parents: Your doctors may have already talked to you about the Tdap vaccine to prevent tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis, as well as the flu shot to prevent influenza. Did you know that the HPV vaccine is recommended to prevent cervical and HPV-associated cancers? Find out more about recommended immunizations for children here: http://bit.ly/2TfY07I

Image of doctor talking to patient and her son. Overlay text reads Did you know? Children as young as ages 9-10 can receive the HPV vaccine if recommended by their provider.

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Clinicians: What can you do to ensure your adolescent patients are fully vaccinated?  Use these #HowIRecommend Vaccination video series to protect patients against cervical cancer: https://bit.ly/31r1PiJ

Image of Black female doctor. Overlay text reads: Providers, how does your practice routinely recommend HPV cancer risk reduction?

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It’s not just about you, it’s about your loved ones too. Get the inside knowledge about cervical cancer from actress Cote de Pablo and CDC: http://bit.ly/2cLzsk3

Image of actress Cote de Pablo with a quote

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Individuals who have a cervix should be screened according to national guidelines. This may include transgender or gender non-conforming patients. Read more about cervical cancer screening recommendations here: https://bit.ly/3mKSusd  

Image of Black transgender man standing against nature backdrop

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Cancer Care Providers: It is important for your patients to resume cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination even during the COVID-19 pandemic. Follow these strategies from the American Cancer Society to get screening and vaccination back on track:  https://bit.ly/3C6EQq2

Image of female doctor with mask and face shield

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Parents: It is important that adolescents are vaccinated against vaccine-preventable diseases even during the pandemic. Keep your children up to date with their recommended vaccinations, including the HPV vaccination, which can prevent cervical cancer: https://bit.ly/340372G

Image of doctor speaking to young, female patient

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Transmasculine persons with a cervix should talk to their doctor about cervical cancer screening and the HPV vaccine. Find a LGBTQ-welcoming provider at  https://bit.ly/3F6LRJf

Image of transgender man standing with a street in the background

Download Graphic
Are you 26 or younger? Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine to protect you against HPV-related cancers. Learn more at https://bit.ly/3ooJjzH
Image of young, female Black teenager wearing yellow shirt. Text overlay reads Are you 26 or younger? Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine

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Providers, implicit bias can affect how you practice and recommend cervical cancer screening and follow up care. Check out GW Cancer Center’s Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) training to learn more about recognizing implicit bias: https://bit.ly/30IiDSm
Image of doctor talking to patient. Text overlay defines implicit bias

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How to Post on LinkedIn
  1. Download the suggested graphic.
  2. Highlight the corresponding message with your cursor. Right click and select "Copy."
  3. Open LinkedIn. If you aren't already logged in, enter your email address and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap "Start a post" from the main share box. This box is at the top of your profile.
  5. Tap "Photo" from the top of the post screen, then select the downloaded graphic to upload and tap "Done." Doing so adds the photo to your post.
  6. Tap "Post." It's in the the bottom-right. Doing so will create your post and add it to the page you're on.
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Healthcare Providers: During the COVID-19 pandemic, prioritize individuals in cervical cancer surveillance with a previous abnormal screening result, those who were scheduled for follow-up exams, colposcopy, or excisional treatment. See more tips on cervical cancer screening during COVID-19 here: https://bit.ly/2VzJYAg

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Healthcare Providers: As your practice returns to providing cancer screening, follow these cancer screening guidelines from the American Cancer Society to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission and ensure that screening is done safely: https://bit.ly/2HBZXug

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Healthcare Providers: Check out this resource from the National Cancer Institute to learn about the latest evidence-based information about cervical cancer screening: http://bit.ly/2x5F9T9

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Healthcare provider recommendations motivate parents to say “yes” to the HPV vaccination. These Communication training tools from HPV IQ can be used to educate providers and vaccine prescribers on how to communicate with patients and vaccine-hesitant parents about the HPV vaccine: https://bit.ly/39YwypL

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Healthcare Providers: The biggest predictor of HPV vaccination uptake is a strong recommendation from a health care provider. Check out this Action Guide to find detailed steps, evidence-based strategies, and tools for your clinic to increase HPV vaccination and prevent cervical cancer: https://bit.ly/3H7wHW9

Image of Black female doctor. Overlay text reads: Providers, how does your practice routinely recommend HPV cancer risk reduction?

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Looking for information on clinical trials for cervical cancer treatment?  Check out this list from the National Cancer Institute: http://bit.ly/2CRdoDe

Image of microscope and information on finding clinical trials

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Providers, implicit bias can affect how you practice and recommend cervical cancer screening and follow up care. Check out GW Cancer Center’s Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) training, Module 4 to learn more about recognizing and correcting implicit biases: https://bit.ly/30IiDSm
Image of doctor talking to patient. Text overlay defines implicit bias

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How to Post on Instagram
  1. Download the suggested graphic.
  2. Highlight the corresponding message with your cursor. Right click and select "Copy."
  3. Open Instagram. If you aren't already logged in, enter your username (or phone number) and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap the plus sign box. This box is at the top right. Select the downloaded graphic or drag it into the box to upload it.
  5. Select "Square (1:1)" for the aspect ratio, then click "Next."
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We’re kicking off #CervicalHealthMonth! Read about some ways you can reduce your risk of #cervicalcancer at cdc.gov/cancer/cervical

Infographic displaying information on cervical cancer statistics and ways to prevent it

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Almost all #CervicalCancer is caused by HPV. Talk to your doctor to see if the #HPVvax is right for you and your family. Visit cdc.gov/hpv for more information

Image of mom and dad with two kids with overlay text stating protect yourself and your loved ones. Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine.

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Learn from a provider about the importance of getting the #HPVvax from @CDCgov’s “Can I Ask You a Question?” Youtube video series at cdc.gov/hpv/parents
#CervicalHealthMonth

Image of patient talking to her doctor about the HPV vaccine

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Parents: You are the key to closing the door to #CervicalCancer. Watch this video from @CDCgov’s “How I Recommend HPV Vaccine” series on the importance of #HPVvax at cdc.gov/vaccines/howirecommend/

Image of Asian American mom and teenage daughter

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Did you know that you can reduce your risk of #CervicalCancer with regular screening tests and vaccination? @CDCgov has more information on screening at cdc.gov/cancer/cervical

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#CervicalCancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 570,000 new cases worlwide in 2018. Learn how the #HPVVax can lower these rates from the @WHO at who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/human-papillomavirus-(hpv)-and-cervical-cancer

Image of hands holding a globe with cervical cancer symbol. Text overlay reads that cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women globally. The HPV vaccine can lower this statistic.

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#Clinicians: Are you up-to-date on the current #HPVvax and #CervicalCancer screening recommendations? See more at cdc.gov/vitalsigns/cervical-cancer/

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#Clinicians: Here are some tips and time-savers for talking with parents about #HPVvax:   http://bit.ly/HPVTipsTimesavers   #CervicalHealthMonth

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Looking for information on #clinical trials for #CervicalCancer treatment?  Check out this list from the @NationalCancerInstitute at cancer.gov

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Parents: Are your kids vaccinated against #CervicalCancer? @CDCgov & partners recommend #HPVvax for kids ages 11-12 (and even as early as ages 9-10). Find out more about recommended #immunizations for your children at cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules

Image of doctor talking to patient and her son. Overlay text reads Did you know? Children as young as ages 9-10 can receive the HPV vaccine if recommended by their provider.

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#HealthcareProviders: Ensure your adolescent patients are fully vaccinated by using these #HowIRecommend vaccination video series to help you make effective recommendations at cdc.gov/vaccines/howirecommend/ 
#CervicalHealthMonth

Image of Black female doctor. Overlay text reads: Providers, how does your practice routinely recommend HPV cancer risk reduction?

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It’s not just about you, it’s about your loved ones too. Learn more about #cervicalcancer from actress Cote de Pablo and @CDCgov: cdc.gov/cancer/knowledge

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#HealthcareProviders: Patients who have a cervix, including transgender or gender non-conforming patients, should be screened according to national guidelines: bit.ly/3mKSusd #CervicalHealthMonth

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#CancerCare Providers: Despite #COVID19, it is important for patients to resume #CervicalCancer screening and #HPVvax. Follow these strategies from @AmericanCancer to get screening and #HPVvax back on track: acs4ccc.org/acs-guidance-on-cancer-screening-during-covid-19

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Parents: Despite the challenges of #COVID19, it is important to keep your children up to date with the #HPVvax which can prevent #CervicalCancer. Check out cancer.org/healthy/hpv-vaccine/vaccination-during-covid

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Transmasculine persons with a cervix should talk to their doctor about #cervicalcancer screening and the #HPVvax. Find a LGBTQ-welcoming provider at cancer-network.org/providerdatabases
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Are you 26 or younger? Ask your doctor about the #HPV #vaccine to protect you against HPV-related #cancers. Learn more at cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/hpv
Image of young, female Black teenager wearing yellow shirt. Text overlay reads Are you 26 or younger? Ask your doctor about the HPV vaccine

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Providers, #implicit #bias can affect how you practice and recommend #cervicalcancer screening and follow up care. Check out GW Cancer Center’s Together, Equitable, Accessible, Meaningful (TEAM) training on recognizing implicit bias at gwccacademy.com
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Social media management tools like Hootsuite and Sprout Social offer bulk scheduling options for uploading multiple messages at once. The spreadsheets below can be adapted to fit multiple scheduling platforms or services. They are currently formatted to work with Sprout Social's bulk scheduling option. Please review the bulk scheduling format requirements for your specific platform before posting. Messages are sorted by network.

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If you would like to download all images in this social media toolkit, click on each network below for a zip file with each network's graphics. Please note that these image sizes are slightly smaller than the links above due to file size limitations. If you would like to download full resolution versions, simply click on the "Download Graphic" link below each image in the message tables above.

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References

American Cancer Society (2018). Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanics/Latinos, 2018-2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2018. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/cancer-facts-and-figures-for-hispanics-and-latinos/cancer-facts-and-figures-for-hispanics-and-latinos-2018-2020.pdf

American Cancer Society (2020). Steps for Increasing HPV Vaccination in Practice: An Action Guide to Implement Evidence-based Strategies for Clinicians. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/online-documents/en/pdf/flyers/steps-for-increasing-hpv-vaccination-in-practice.pdf 

American Psychological Association (2020). APA Dictionary of Psychology: motivational interviewing. Retrieved from https://dictionary.apa.org/motivational-interviewing

Baezconde-Garbanati, L.A., Chatterjee, J. S., Frank, L. B., Murphy, S. T., Moran, M. B., Werth, L. N., Zhao, N., Amezola de Herrera, P., Mayer, D., Kagan, J., & O’Brien, D. (2014). Tamale Lesson: A case study of a narrative health communication intervention. Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 7(2), 82–92. https://doi.org/10.1179/1753807614Y.0000000055

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2019). Educate the Parent or Patient. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/admin/educating-patients.html#:~:text=Health%20care%20personnel%20should%20be,and%20consistent%20information%20about%20vaccines.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2019). Talking to Parents about HPV Vaccine. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/hcp/for-hcp-tipsheet-hpv.pdf

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2020). Cancers Caused by HPV are Preventable. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/hcp/protecting-patients.html 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2020). HPV-Associated Cervical Cancer. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/statistics/cervical.htm

Ford, S., Tarraf, W., Williams, K. P., Roman, L. A., & Leach, R. (2021). Differences in cervical cancer screening and follow-up for black and white women in the United States. Gynecologic Oncology, 160(2), 369–374. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.11.027

Fuzzell, L. N., Perkins, R. B., Christy, S. M., Lake, P. W., & Vadaparampil, S. T. (2021). Cervical cancer screening in the United States: Challenges and potential solutions for underscreened groups. Preventive Medicine, 144, 106400–106400. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2020.106400

Gagneur A. (2020). Motivational interviewing: A powerful tool to address vaccine hesitancy. Canada communicable disease report = Releve des maladies transmissibles au Canada, 46(4), 93–97. https://doi.org/10.14745/ccdr.v46i04a06

Gilkey, M. B., Calo, W. A., Moss, J. L., Shah, P. D., Marciniak, M. W., & Brewer, N. T. (2016). Provider communication and HPV vaccination: The impact of recommendation quality. Vaccine, 34(9), 1187–1192. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.01.023

Johnson, N. L., Head, K. J., Scott, S. F., & Zimet, G. D. (2020). Persistent Disparities in Cervical Cancer Screening Uptake: Knowledge and Sociodemographic Determinants of Papanicolaou and Human Papillomavirus Testing Among Women in the United States. Public health reports (Washington, D.C.:1974), 135(4), 483–491. https://doi.org/10.1177/0033354920925094

Kasberg, A., National LGBT Cancer Network (2019). Cervical Cancer Info. Retrieved from https://cancer-network.org/resources/cancer-cards/cervical-cancer-info/

Lee, R.J., Madan, R. A., Kim, J., Posadas, E. M., & Yu, E. Y. (2021). Disparities in Cancer Care and the Asian American Population. The Oncologist (Dayton, Ohio), 26(6), 453–460. https://doi.org/10.1002/onco.13748

Lee, Y.S., Roh, S., Jun, J. S., Goins, R. T., & McKinley, C. E. (2021). Cervical cancer screening behaviors among American Indian women: Cervical cancer literacy and health belief model. Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 30(5), 413–429. https://doi.org/10.1080/15313204.2020.1730285

McDowell, M. (2018). Cervical Cancer Screening Preferences Among Trans-Masculine Individuals: Patient-Collected Human Papillomavirus Vaginal Swabs Versus Provider-Administered Pap Tests. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard Medical School. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37006462

Meites E., Kempe A., Markowitz L.E. (2016) Use of a 2-Dose Schedule for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination — Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep; 65:1405–1408. http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6549a5

Meites E, Szilagyi P.G., Chesson H.W., Unger E.R., Romero J.R., Markowitz L.E. (2019) Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Adults: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019; 68:698–702. http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6832a3

Melkonian, S. C., Jim, M. A., Haverkamp, D., Wiggins, C. L., McCollum, J., White, M. C., Kaur, J. S., & Espey, D. K. (2019). Disparities in Cancer Incidence and Trends among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 2010-2015. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 28(10), 1604–1611. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0288

Musa, J., Achenbach, C. J., O’Dwyer, L. C., Evans, C. T., McHugh, M., Hou, L., Simon, M. A., Murphy, R. L., & Jordan, N. (2017). Effect of cervical cancer education and provider recommendation for screening on screening rates: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PloS One, 12(9), e0183924–e0183924. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183924

National Cancer Institute. (2020). Cancer disparities. Retrieved August 11, 2021 from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/disparities 

Nuestras Voces Network & Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment Advocacy and Leadership [APPEAL] (2019, July 17). What Works: Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening Amongst Hispanics, Asian & Pacific Islander Populations [Webinar]. Nuestras Voces & APPEAL. https://appealforhealth.org/what-works-increasing-cervical-cancer-screenings-for-hispanics-and-aanhpi-communities/

Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2020). Immunizations and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Retrieved from https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=37

Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2021). Cancer and Hispanic Americans. Retrieved from https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=61

Reno, J. E., Thomas, J., Pyrzanowski, J., Lockhart, S., O'Leary, S. T., Campagna, E. J., & Dempsey, A. F. (2019). Examining strategies for improving healthcare providers' communication about adolescent HPV vaccination: evaluation of secondary outcomes in a randomized controlled trial. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics, 15(7-8), 1592–1598. https://doi.org/10.1080/21645515.2018.1547607

United States Preventive Services Taskforce (2018). Recommendation: Cervical Cancer: Screening. Retrieved from https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/cervical-cancer-screening

U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). United States Cancer Statistics Working Group, U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool, based on 2020 submission data (1999-2018). Retrieved from https://gis.cdc.gov/Cancer/USCS/DataViz.html

Van Dyne E.A., Henley S.J., Saraiya M., Thomas C.C., Markowitz L.E., Benard V.B. (2018). Trends in Human Papillomavirus–Associated Cancers — United States, 1999–2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67: 918–924. http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6733a2

Watson, M., Benard, V., King, J., Crawford, A., & Saraiya, M. (2017). National assessment of HPV and Pap tests: Changes in cervical cancer screening, National Health Interview Survey. Preventive medicine, 100, 243–247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.05.004

White-Means, S., and Osmani, A. R. (2017). Racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication with breast cancer patients: Evidence from 2011 MEPS and experiences with cancer supplement. INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, 54, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1177/0046958017727104

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